35 thoughts on “Viral Now

    • Before the Caracas Metro was opened, there were endless adds on how to use it, what you could/should do and not do. It was amazing to see how well behaved people were underground.

      • Yes, they called it “the underground syndrome” because people behave differently once they were inside the metro station…I used to take the metro every day in the early 1980’s…watching the video is so sad and painful !

    • After every single venezuelan start paying taxes, according to what you make, but pay still… you will see people caring more about their wagons, their metro, their schools, become more involved citizens… but of course the government is not interested on that day to come to reality because that will be a very bad day for them… very bad

      • I don’t know what you are talking about… taxes? I’m a young male in full capacity to stand for long periods of time yet run into the train and jump over other people’s heads to get a seat. What do you mean I have to pay taxes???

        • Meaning that your taxes are the ones who build the metro and takes care of the maintenance of the seats after the patones jump to take a seat and destroy them. Not that because you r not paying taxes right now they didnt ‘t build it and mantain it with your money dude, you understand that right?. Just like a pressure cooker was designed for civilized peope to cook and not chechens to make bombs, the best and most cost effective way to maintain a metro wagon is people not abusing the wear of it. A concept one can perceive in some European countries (not Italy) and used to in the US as well.

    • Pixar, I don’t know if when you say “THAT” you mean there is some sort of cultural problem going on here that explains that behavior. That seems to be the interpretation that some fellow commenters are giving to this. If that is the case, I must say I disagree. We Venezuelans seem to be fascinated by how different we Venezuelans are supposed to be, and I don’t think that is the case. This is basically an economic problem: the scarcity of commuting services leads to this (similar to what happens with people running to get a hold on chicken in the supermarkets), and the same would happen anywhere in the world. An interesting question is whether our society is less demanding of high-quality public services (do we punish our politicians less than they do in other countries?, and if so, is that a matter of “culltural differences”, or is it more related to educational levels, public awereness, etc.?), but that is a somewhat different issue. I don’t think there is anything particular to the Venezuelan DNA that makes us more chaos-loving, although I do believe that we have become disturbingly used to situations like these. Context is everything.

    • the current gobiernillo, inheritor of Chávez, would say you DON’T fix that problem. For it fits with the Eternal Commander’s words, as follows:

      “Tenemos que terminar de borrar las formulas extrañas a nosotros mismos y buscar los códigos de nuestro pensamiento más antiguo”.

      Now, substitute ‘las formulas extrañas a nosotros mismos’ for ‘el buen comportamiento’ and a few other embellishments so that the Eternal Commander’s words do not lose their significance, becoming:

      “Tenemos que terminar de borrar el buen comportamiento y buscar los códigos bochincheros de nuestro pensamiento más antiguo”.

  1. This video seems completely normal in a country where “para el Pueblo” appears to be some sort of slang that translates into “Yo primero!”

  2. Are you talking about the same cadena where he later revealed that he had severe digestive distress? Pues les digo que esto también terminó en una cagada, if you’ll pardon my French

  3. What we see is the spectacle of an unruly crowd of happy children, filled with exhuberant animal spirits playfully (and savagely) pouring into the carriage of an empty train wagon , they ve had to wait for the doors to open so they are impatient and excited, Their average mental age , 13 or, 14 years old ?, their average IQ ?: 84 ( the average in Venezuela:) They are normal citizens , they vote in Venezuelan elections , their fevered opinions and gut passions probably make up a large percentage of Venezuelan public opinion . They appear to be young , thus they represent the future of Venezuela . We live in a Democracy , we owe them respect and admiration , they are THE PEOPLE !!

    • “their average IQ ?: 84 ( the average in Venezuela:)”

      Bill, are you being serious on that, or is that part of the overall facetiousness of your comment?

      • Roy ; maybe my memory fails me , thats what I recollect from having read a table published by the Economist some months ago which compared the IQ of many countries population and an index which measured their level of ill health , malnutrition and the like . I was as surprised as you are now !! I remember that one of the smartest people were the mongolians ( average IQ 101) . Also surprised that while the Cubans health index was better than Venezuelas their average IQ was similar . Some of these indexes are dated , they rise and fall . I will try and check and confirm the data for you !!

        • The Internet has a table of IQ per country but the source is difficult to identify , according to the table Venezuelans went from having a IQ of 87 in 2002 to an IQ of 84 in 2006 ( is Chavismo making us dumber??) . Cubans IQ is 85 , Colombians 89. I know I copied the Economist table somewhere but cant find it now. Generally Orientals have the highest IQ’s followed by the US and most European contries , in the Middle were the latin american countries ( improving as you go to the Cono Sur) , the worst IQ in the americas : Haiti , the worst of all world IQ’s : the african countries.!! The economist article reported an international study which comfirmed the thesis that Children’s brains being most demanding of energy to sustain their development , any high malnourishment or ill health levels would adversely affect their intellectual growth which would show in each country’s average IQ’s. This reminded me of a talk with a very experienced pediatrician who reported having participated in a study ( proyecto venezuela) which kept tabs on the height and weight growth of children as compared to children from other countries , and how initially they gained in these parameters and them starting backtracking in the early 90’s , the stats growing worse and worse every year , something was happening that the children werent being nourished and taken care of as before

  4. Oh… My… there is lack of everything in there… but the physical fitnes of some guys.
    On a second thought.
    Who recorded this? Someone in the train before passengers are allowed?

  5. It was shot through the opposite window. The truly frightening part is the game of “chicken” you have play on the edge of the platform as the train pulls in if you want to get on board. It took us four trains to get used to the idea of holding back the crowd behind you while the train whizzes past your nose…while holding on to each other, your stuff and your wallet.

  6. Shit like this is why I’m never going back to Venezuela.

    Amidst all that bullshit people are still laughing about it, seriously, what a bunch of retards.

  7. If I had to run a campaign on Venezuela, its main theme would be dignity. That’s the most important thing we’ve lost. In 14 years we’ve become a country where:

    You are grateful for being robbed but not killed
    You protest against the power company for not announcing a 10 hours blackout but not for the blackout itself.
    You fight off your neighbor for chicken, meat, milk, access to the subway or the train, yet keep the same people in charge of things.
    You work on full time stable jobs yet have to survive on USD 100 monthly (or USD 3 per day), which is only one dollar above extreme poverty by international standards.
    You can go through high school without receiving any math education.
    You go to the hospital and there aren’t enough doctors and, you have to buy the supplies yourself, and pray there’s not much crime while you’re there.
    You can’t choose most of the things you buy, and be grateful that you found them overpriced but there.

  8. Am I the only one who fears for the lives of children or the elderly that could find themselves in the middle of that chaos?

  9. I don’t think that would be physically possible on Chicago transit cars. The doors are too narrow, other spaces just aren’t large enough. The car seems much wider than ours. I see several guys run across the car and then vault over the seat back (?) just below the camera. Our cars aren’t wide enough for that. The space between the car wall and the pillar at the inside edge of the seat isn’t large enough either. Maybe your seat backs are lower.

    Chicago has its hordes of rowdy children, but I’ve never seen anything like that. Also – it seems odd that this huge crowd would all board at one station, because the car was empty.

  10. Reblogged this on Fino Cambur and commented:
    This is a fun little view into the metro here. I’ve never seen something like this live during my numerous metro trips. Looking at this and at the way people drive here…it’s clear that most people are mainly out for themselves. Is that a symptom of desperate times? Does that fit Maslow’s hierarchy of needs?

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