25 thoughts on “The World is my Podcast

  1. Ha! I posted on another thread just now that I’d heard you earlier today! Congratulations on a job well done.

    • Thanks! I’m not super comfortable doing radio yet, but I like to think each time I do it I get a little bit better at it.

      (Of course, this one was recorded rather than Live, and the nice people at PRI were kind enough to edit out the incoherent gibberish…)

      • to become more comfortable doing radio, here’s a wild suggestion that may or may not work. How about some active role playing?
        Pull out your recorder (Edirol or otherwise), and start with the other side of the coin: you as interviewer and presenter. Interview Kimi, your wife, on say, a particular meal, or after an outing. (Kimi may have some critical analyses of her day school.) Progress with other vignettes, using willing subjects. Make sure you interject and opine. As I said, it’s a wild suggestion that may or may not help you get comfortable with audio.

      • Hee hee – actually I got in trouble at home over that one. As my wife never tires of pointing out, it’s Noh Theater that westerners mean when we talk about highly stylized, codified Japanese stage production. Kabuki’s supposed to be fun.

        • However you call it, I see it as you trademark. In fact, I tuned to NPR by chance as the interview was happening and heard the reporter say Chavez and then I hear someone talk abou the Kabuki theatre in Vzla and I go, wait a minute yo conozco este pana… Nice interview and it’s also nice to put a voice to the face :)

          • Roberto, that’s exactly what happened to me. In fact, I had just started my car, and I didn’t start driving until the interviewer (Katy) finished up and id’d Quico :-)

  2. You nailed with this interview!, Congratulations. I’m glad that there are people out there talking about facts and reality of Venezuelan situation. Otherwise we will have all this media outlets filled with chavista propaganda that sends messages that everything is OK. which obviusly is not, otherwise they wouldn’t feel the need to bring their master.

  3. Quico…bu e ní si ma :D you sounded very coherent and on top of things. Como si estuvieses viviendo en sta fé pues. You have the objectivity that physical distance provides, sin cortarte las venas en asterisco, that physical proximity to our beautiful but weird country provides.

  4. Good job! Informative but even-handed and credible to an uniformed audience. You might add next time that our shortages are due to the difficulty of importing more goods as domestic production gets pounded by ongoing nationalizations.

    • You could also add that the 31% devaluation helps the government pay its bill, but can’t possibly help contain the 30% inflation rate that is making life hard in Venezuela but apparently not hampering Hugo Chavez’s popularity.

    • Oh, Arturo, Arturo, Arturito…I’m just shaking my head at you right now. You silly PSF! Don’t you think you could best spend your time at Aporrea, or VTV, or somewhere like that? I hope you understand that no one here really gives a flying flip (nice word used here) about what you say, or even think? I mean, you’re barking up the wrong tree (or pissing on the wrong leg) here. Seriously, you need to reconsider just why you come here. Oh, wait…I think I’ve got it. You’re a sado-masochist!!! OMG! Wow, I wonder just how difficult it’s been for you to keep that “under wraps”! Hehehehehe – did ya get that? “Under wraps”? Hehehehehehe…

    • Arturo comes to these oppo blog pages, hungry for information, for context, which is what he gets. Otherwise he wouldn’t bother coming back, time after time. But Arturo lacks the acumen to provide the same level of context. A video clip is all he can muster. No wonder Aporrea and the like feel like rags for morons. They are a perfect match for each other.

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