All eyes on Miranda

Una ayudaíta ...

Una ayudaíta …

Twenty three Venezuelan states will pick governors today, but there is one race that looms larger than the rest: the race in Miranda.

If Henrique Capriles Radonski is re-elected comfortably, he cements his status as the front-runner for any Presidential election that may be coming.

If he loses, his political career is over for now.

If he wins tightly … then it gets interesting. A win is a win, so I think that he would still be at the top of the list for the presidential election. But people will loudly question his ability to beat a chavista candidate on a national scale. “If you lose to Hugo Chávez by ten points, and you can’t even beat a bad candidate like Elías Jaua comfortably in a state you have governed reasonably well, then there is something wrong with you,” dissenting voices will surely say.

Yes, Zulia is important – how Pablo Pérez does in Venezuela’s most populous state will make or break UNT’s relevance in national politics. Lara, Carabobo, Táchira, Mérida, Nueva Esparta, and Sucre are all important too.

But voters in Miranda are electing more than a governor. They are electing a presidential candidate.

19 thoughts on “All eyes on Miranda

  1. Just voted in Barquisimeto. Took more than a half hour. Very fluid (people coming and going) in my voting station. Lighter than last October. The SIE wasn’t a problem this time around.

  2. I pray that globovision is enlightened and aritifially props up Maria Corina this time around, instead of proping up UNT and PJ.

  3. I’m reading lots of abstention, so will Jaua win? what a frigging genious Capriles and the MUD are, jesus f c.

  4. I’m hearing very short lines compared to October. Seemingly not good for the opposition if the PSUV system is in full swing.

  5. Did Capriles really asked people to update their Blackberry status text to “I’m voting” on live television? speechless.

  6. F.T. a while back, before his brief voluntary exile, talked of the coming “train wreck” governorship elections. Let’s all hope, and pray, that the Oppo at least maintains a viable political presence at this very historical juncture….

  7. I just voted in Baruta, in a center where the opposition usually wins with about 90 percent of the vote. My brother voted around 1 and told me that the center was empty and that the members of his table told him that turnout in that table was around 30 percent. When I went, there was line and when I left the block was packed with people looking for a spot, so I’m guessing that we are having an afternoon opposition turnout.

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