Maduro takes center stage

YBGHBT4AS5chavez_y_maduroI discuss the Aporrea-roots reaction, among other things, over at Foreign Policy’s Transitions blog,

One commentator in the widely read pro-Chávez forum Aporrea criticized the selection of Maduro, claiming the vice-president is not radical enough and is a lover of the bourgeois lifestyle. Another called for taking Chávez’s absence as an opportunity for further debate within chavista structures. The very same forum showed that chavistasare split, with some criticizing that Maduro is unpopular with the base supporters, while others argued that the will of the President should be respected and trusted in this emergency. One prominent academic close to the chavista movement acknowledged that nobody could match Chavez’s unique leadership qualities, but that the faithful should cast doubts aside and assume the choice of Maduro as legitimate.

31 thoughts on “Maduro takes center stage

  1. “Maduro is also the architect of some of Hugo Chávez’s most cringe-inducing foreign liaisons. He has traveled numerous times to Iran, supported Syria’s Bashar al-Assad, and is the architect of Venezuela’s strange infatuation with Belarus dictator Alexander Lukashenko.”

    I hate the use of the word “architect” (twice!) here…

    Realisitically, we have no way of knowing whether Maduro’s role in these liaisons was as architect, engineer, plumber, gopher or pimp.

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  2. “Maduro has been the visible figurehead of some of Hugo Chávez’s most cringe-inducing foreign liaisons. He has traveled numerous times to Iran, supported Syria’s Bashar al-Assad, and has been instrumental in Venezuela’s strange infatuation with Belarus dictator Alexander Lukashenko.”

    Better?

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    • Let’s not forget Maduro with Zelaya, por los caminos verdes de Honduras. I think he showed some bravery there, he could have been shot. But I think it was well received by the radicals of PSUV and Cuba.
      It is also remarkable that he has been so long Chancelor that he is well connected internationally.

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    • It probably has to do that he’s always seen mostly in a tuxedo rather than sporting a red shirt walking around in campaigns and shit.

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      • I will never forget a photo and accompanying note of an indignant wintercoated Maduro carrying a cart stacked with Vuitton TRUNKS at JFK when the airport officials wondered about his paying cash (billete sobre billete) for two first class tickets and were not impressed with his venezuelan diplomatic passport. I guess the referred to that type of scenario….

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        • I disagree. These are the trappings of landed aristocracy, no? Let’s not get our bourgeois and our aristocracy mixed up!

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  3. Regardless of what they (chavistas) think of Maduro, or how much they question Chavez’s choice, they’d still vote for Maduro because that’s what the leader has instructed them to do and they will not contradict him

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    • Will they?

      A nontrivial number will likely decide to stay home in protest of the choice of Maduro, or because they simply don’t like him enough to be bothered to vote for him. Is it consistent with their ideological goals? No. But we’ve known for quite some time now that voters vote based on emotions…

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  4. Latest conspiracy theory:
    Chavez is sick but he is going to last a couple of years or more, so he put Maduro in while he catches a breather and Maduro goes ahead with the unavoidable paquetazo. Maduro se quema, Chavez comes back and takes control again.
    Maduro es la enfermera que pone la vacuna a los pacientes del pediatra Chavez.

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    • Doubt it very much Chavez never needed to do that he could have always passed the paquetazo and blamed it on El Imperio, Bush, Obama, La 4a, the escualido, El Niño whatever

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    • I don’t think Chavez has two years right now. Hugo might have had two (or much more than two) years left on June 2011. Now it looks more like mere months if not weeks if they don’t kill him on an operating table.

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      • You should look at photo essays of people who are dying from cancer. Even when a patient is bone thin and looks like death it can take many further months.

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          • In a way, yes. Because revelation would provide a more accurate guesstimate of the timeline Chávez has. But as important is the stage of cancer. Chávez and the Castros prefer to keep things hush-hush so as to maintain imbalance, uncertainty, and of course, chaos — necessary components in maintaining domination.

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            • Of course we agree on this. Sorry, I was trying to poke at yoyo for implying that all cancers had equivalent profiles and timelines. Only someone with yoyo’s ill intent would try such a generalization.

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        • Ok, I am speculating wildly. But what can we do? No information and/or outright lies is what Hugo Chavez, his Cuban handlers and the Chavernment have fed us, you and me alike, and all of Venezuela. We don’t even have a clue what he has, except that…

          How much time a patient with aggressive cancer in the pelvic area, 2 recurrences, 4 operations, 4+ rounds of chemo and 4+ of radio might have to live, after he and his followers decided that he HAD to campaign and be elected and continue the mind-rape, trolling and sack of Venezuela for as long as he lasted, instead of retiring from power, adopting a more peaceful attitude and generally arranging for a peaceful succession, acceptable to his supporters and opponents might have left after all?. That DOES tend to shorten life expectations seriously, or doesn’t it?

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  5. Aporrea is a good virtual reflection of the political reality in Venezuela. A mashup!
    First you have the classic Marxists who always speak of “Comrade Chavez”our brother in the struggle for a classless Marxist Venezuela, where all are equal and from each according to his ability and to each according to his need………. In short these folks are purists in their belief in the “Collective”. Too bad Comrade Chavez did not put all the oil money on the table to be used according to the needs of Venezuelans.
    Second we have the Democratic Socialists who feel that Presidente Chavez has the popular support and love of the majority of Venezuelans and all the Saints. At least that’s what the polls and TV ratings say and as long as there are no riots, must be right?
    Last we have the ones who refer to HIM as El Comandante. Which in Spanish translates to “we will help the people after we help ourselves”! But even this group cannot bring themselves to call Maduro “Subcomandante”!!
    What they all have in common is that they are all well educated and find the thought of a bus driver running the country sickening (as if the last 14 years were not).
    One of them need to write a post on Unity.

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