Gabriela Montero, a brave artist

She didn’t have to, but we’re glad she did

Venezuelan pianist Gabriela Montero is a spell-binding Venezuelan pianist. In a wonderful post over at HuffPo, she paints the Venezuelan reality in bold colors and doesn’t hold back when she says stuff like,

“I am not a politician. I am a musician. Far from wishing to stoke the flames of partisanship, my music is an unsolicited, personally financed, non-affiliated protest and personal expression of regret. It is my appeal for national reconciliation and regrowth. It is my attempt to emotionally and metaphorically inform those around the world who are unaware of, or actively mis-informed as to, the daily reality of life in a disintegrating, yet abundant and beautiful Venezuela. It is a counter-cry to those with a far louder voice than mine, respected members of the artistic community like Sean Penn, whose harmfully romanticized view of the Bolivarian Revolution bares no resemblance to the daily insecurity faced by a nation which can afford to do so, so much better. The Venezuelan people must now insist upon it, and the international community must keep vigil to ensure a peaceful and democratic presidential election on October 7th.”

Bravo, Gabriela. The muse is working overtime.

12 thoughts on “Gabriela Montero, a brave artist

  1. I don’t think I’ve read anything as eloquent on the day-to-day reality in Venezuela as I have in this article by Montero. Through her elegant writing, she provides lucidity, balance, and credibility. She weaves these assets with hard statistics on murder rates, posits the thought of what Venezuela should be as a nation (the Norway of Latin America) given its resources, and calls on the international community to keep vigil over the coming elections.

    This article is not the work of an airhead artiste. Which is why she gains so much traction with her framing of Sean Penn’s harmful romanticism of the Bolivarian Revolution.

    Montero got it all in. To-ito. Felicitaciones, Gabriela!

  2. I hardly ever comment, but I am moved by this courageous young lady ability to put it in such an exemplary manner. Well said, well articulated and to the point. Talk about a true patriot!
    I bet she can’t wear miniskirts!

  3. Excellent writing by Gabriela Montero. I cannot help comparing her clear and solid views with Dudamel’s “guabineo” and just hope she’s the one getting the opportunity to play in HCR’s inauguration.

  4. Here is her “PLOP” statement: ” It is a counter-cry to those with a far louder voice than mine, respected members of the artistic community like Sean Penn, whose harmfully romanticized view of the Bolivarian Revolution bares no resemblance to the daily insecurity faced by a nation which can afford to do so, so much better. ”
    And, “bares” should be “bears”…

    • you’re right on “bears”. I didn’t catch that.
      it’s too bad that Sean Penn was the only harmful romantic singled out, given the others. Then again, mention of too many would have diluted the strength of her message.

  5. A really moving piece of writing. Thank you so very much to Gabriela, and CC for bringing it to our attention.

  6. Good for Gabriella! The unaffected, straighforward style does indeed contrast eloquently with the “guabineo” cited elsewhere. As for bares-bears typo-correction, come now Cat, we don’t know whether it was a) originally in Spanish and deftly – a little too deftly maybe – translated or; b) written originally as above and ill trasnscribed. It’s a) Friday, b) not raining and c) there is a path so cut them some slack. With a smile.

  7. Now I love her even more, if that’s even possible. For those who have not had a chance, take a look at this brief doc (<25min), in which Gabriela Montero discusses and performs ExPatria:

  8. Congratulations Ms. Montero. I,m sure that your friend and master CARLOS DUARTE, must be very happy with this improvisation seeing from heaven, and playing himself “a cuatro manos” with you.
    God bless you and your family.

Comments are closed.